Aleister Crowley Magija w teorii i praktyce. 3 likes. Book. This cuts my soul the way prime John Crowley always does, but this book takes that stream Magija sećanja, Hermes Triput-veliki (sl. prevod) i njegova učenja. Frater Perdurabo (Aleister Crowley) and Soror Virakam (Mary d Este Sturges) Book 4, Part IV – The Book of the Law Aleister Crowley Book of.

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Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for frowley us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Aegypt by John Crowley. Does the world have a secret history, encoded in myth and legend, reflected in the very windings of our brains? Does the world have crowleh plot? Will her life have the fearful symmetry of the lives led inside the books she reads? Rosie, newly returned to her childhood environs in the Faraways, is reading the historical romances of dead Fellowes Kraft one after another to see her through the hard realities of a divorce.

There is more than one history of the world. Hardcoverpages. The Aegypt Cycle 1. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Aegyptplease sign up.

Lists with This Book. So before I get into the review, a few things you need to know about this book. This is not a book for everyone.

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It’s complicated, it requires the reader to stop and think really hard constantly, there’s little to no “external” plot, but what’s going on inside the characters is hugely important.

To read Crowley’s prose, you need to be focused and awake: Avid readers of classical literature and writers 3 and a half Avid readers of classical literature and writers will find his work very rich, multilayered and interesting, though maybe not entertaining. People who like “The Da Vinci” code won’t understand squat. This book will appeal to readers who are fascinated with history, philosophy, the occult and the possibility that the generally-accepted concept of reality is not all there is.

People who like solid realism will roll their eyes and throw the book out the window. This is a book about how our perception affects our understanding of the world, about how Western mysticism and the related beliefs and superstitions affect our reality through our worldview. The “Aegypt” tetralogy is my husband’s favorite work of fiction.

Aleister Crowley – LGPedia

He’s huge nerd with a English literature degree, so those books are a rare treat to him. Just like the main character amgija “The Solitudes”, he let go of a frustrating and circular academic magijq and spent some time figuring out “What now? But the resemblance ends there. He told me this book would take me through a lot of emotions, including frustration and hilarity, and he was right.

Every once in a while, I would shake the book, yelling “Why are you so stupid?!

So if my review feels scattered and a bit confusing, consider that a preview of what you are in for when you pick up this book! In that process of finding a new path, falling in love, dealing with his family history and so on, he begins to dive into a question an old professor of his planted in his mind: Can the metaphysical be completely ripped apart from the scientific? After all, it’s only a relatively recent trend to separate science and spirituality: Pierce becomes convinced that a country called Aegypt is the answer, that it exists just outside of our perceptions, perhaps at a different time than the historical Egypt; it is the land where magic and occult knowledge comes from and Pierce wants to write its history.

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Summarizing any more than that is really tricky, because Crowley takes this story all over the place, in a non-linear narrative that includes a book-within-a-book, stories about John Dee and William Shakespeare, Giordanno Bruno’s mnemonic techniques and the hippie lifestyle in a small country town.

There is no doubt that this is a beautifully, excessively cleverly written book. But I found it just a bit too ethereal for my taste. It’s definitely a rewarding read, but even Jason admits that it’s not a particularly fun one: Crowley omits to put the text of “Bitten Apples” the book within the book in quotation marks or italics, so when the narrative switches abruptly from the fictional book back to the main story, you get that exact feeling of aggravated confusion you get when someone rudely interrupts your reading break and pulls you back into reality.

It’s jarring, despite the cleverness of the trick. The characters are not particularly likable, but they are not flat-out awful either. I actually think my problem with Crowley’s characters is their blandness.

Smokey in “Little, Big”, as well as most of Alice’s family gave me that same feeling of faded outlines of people, as opposed to bright and multi-dimensional people.

That being said the idea of an internal and external history is a very intriguing topic and I have always been fascinated by occult systems and their history, so digging into those ideas kept me interested to the end. It took me a bit longer than usual to finish this book, probably because I read other books while I was working on this one: I knew my entertainment and escapism fix wasn’t going to come from “Solitudes”, but it had its own rewards.

I really appreciated the beauty of the prose and the technical brilliance, but it was exhausting and I suspect Crowley might have been on a variety of substances when he outlined this story It might take me a while to get to the sequel, but I would really love to see what happens next! View all 8 comments.

Lovers of fantastic as in “fantasy” literature. So you have read The Solitudes or this is the same book Aegyptand you’re wondering whether you’d like to read the other three books in this tetralogy The Aegypt Cycle.

So — no spoilers — here’s what I can tell you: Pierce Moffett and the people of Blackbury Jambs remain prominent in all four volumes, and the thread that runs from start to finish is Pierce’s little life — his flawed, sad, typical, and yet inspiring, often challenging, life as a flawed and ultimately redeemable, forgivable So you have read The Solitudes or this is the same book Aegyptand you’re wondering whether you’d like to read the other three books in this tetralogy The Aegypt Cycle.

Pierce Moffett and the people of Blackbury Jambs remain prominent in all four volumes, and the thread that runs from start to finish is Pierce’s little life — his flawed, sad, typical, and yet inspiring, often challenging, life as a flawed and ultimately redeemable, forgivable, human being. However, we don’t follow Pierce for decades, and we don’t travel with him into his old age. I think of the tetralogy as being anchored to Pierce’s midlife crisis — although he’s a bit younger than literal midlife, he’s certainly having a crisis.

He doesn’t know why he’s here, what his purpose is, what his direction should be. Around him he observes the people of this rural wayside where he has found himself stopping, almost by accident.

He circles around and around a grand idea for a massive literary work centered on Aegypt — a chimera, a parallel universe where magic was real, a world where people used to live and then — and then?

And what happens then? If this all sounds like I am describing the first of the four volumes, that’s not surprising — but I am also describing all four of them.

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The movement forward is tangible as you continue reading. Religion, science, magic, past and present flow in and out, currents of different temperatures but all part of one sea. Everything rushes toward a conclusion, like hurtling down a long, twisting tunnel sometimes very dark from which, in the end, all will burst out into the clean air mafija.

Circling and crosley at once are, I think, good metaphors for the way this story travels toward its very satisfying conclusion. So if you, my friend, would croeley me to tell you how it all ends — I can’t do that. It wouldn’t make sense. You need to get on the raft along with Pierce and ride it through, because the experience is much more than the plot.

This cuts my soul the way prime John Crowley always does, but this book takes that stream of inspiration to its most fantastically baroque consequences. This is the author of “Little, Big” writing both “Foucault’s Pendulum” and something like the “Quicksilver” books simultaneously. With some borrowed tone from “Against croley Day. This is an absurdly self-referential love letter crkwley kooky fr This cuts my soul the way prime John Crowley always does, but this book takes that stream of inspiration to its most fantastically baroque consequences.

This is an absurdly self-referential love letter to kooky frustrated academics, to anyone who has constructed an esoteric universe out of a year of reading, to dreamers out of time who read too much and think too much and just BRIEFLY glimpse the absolute contingency of this fragile world of ours, to anyone who has read a book and felt it must have stolen their last five years of learning and thinking.

Most of all this is magkja how in the moments BETWEEN things Pynchon loves these toothere are uncountable possible futures and pasts, all waiting to collapse quantumlike into the world we know. The seams are cowley over by storytelling. We never stop telling stories. When the world is round, it suddenly always has been.

This is never going to be a novel for very many people, but for those who it is, I am pointing the way. Ecstatic to start “Love and Sleep.

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Feb 06, Pavle rated it really liked it Shelves: Objavljena par godina nakon Kroulijevog Little Big-a, Aegypt odn. A njih crowoey treba iskopati er Krauli, uvek negde izmedju “literarne” tzv.

Nov 19, Prof X rated it did not like it. Also, there’s something about maybe how the old magical stories might be true even though they’re false, which is repeated over and over throughout the book, but never actually gets any further than that.

An utterly baffling book that wastes everyone’s time. Now that ccrowley read this synopsis, you don’t even need to read the book, because this is all that’s in it. View all 5 comments. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To magiha it, click here. I have heard about Crowley’s Aegypt cycle for years but found it difficult to find. When I learned that the cycle was being re-issued, I brought the first volume warily, fearful that it would not live up to the hype.

What I really liked about this first book was Pierce’s musing at the end. ,agija is thinking about an idea of alternative realities and right before he wonders about the outside world and the inner world. There is such truth to that.